The case for yellow line reform

This article was edited on 7 August 2020 following feedback from commentators Yellow lines have been with us since the late 1950s, but were first officially codified in the Traffic Signs Regulations & General Directions in 1964. The system has evolved over time but it still poses numerous headaches for those seeking to manage traffic. … Continue reading The case for yellow line reform

Traffic Signs Manual Chapter 6

No, not the old "illumination of traffic signs" item that was never published and can now be covered neatly in TSRGD itself. This is the re-purposed Chapter 6 that will revolutionise the use of traffic signals in urban areas now that the over-designed monstrosity that is the old DMRB TD 42/95 (now CD 123) has … Continue reading Traffic Signs Manual Chapter 6

Height Restrictions and the Correct Approach

Last month I was invited to provide a presentation to the IHE Traffic Signs Panel once more, and this year I focused on a problem that causes numerous difficulties for both managers of highway networks and the railway system alike. There are an estimated 1,800 bridge strikes a year on the network which on average … Continue reading Height Restrictions and the Correct Approach

A Mini-Rantabout Mini-Roundabouts

Not strictly a total signs post this, but recent discussions over on SABRE (and on Twitter) suggest that there is a serious inability to get these features right. This in turn has major safety implications as misuse of mini-roundabouts can cause confusion and thus collisions. Naturally, the Design Manual for Roads & Bridges manages to … Continue reading A Mini-Rantabout Mini-Roundabouts

Expressways and why they’re not going to work.

Those who have been keeping up with the many, many pages of documents flying out from DfT towers recently will have heard of 'Expressways'. This is a, supposedly, new concept where higher quality all-purpose routes will be transformed into what is essentially a motorway, but not for viewers in Scotland as this is a Highways … Continue reading Expressways and why they’re not going to work.

Should we allow exemptions to No Entry signs? A lesson from Ireland.

One of the big problems with restricted lengths of road that only allow certain classes of traffic is how to convey this meaning to other drivers. Take Manchester as an example, where unlawful incursions onto the off-street running sections of Metrolink is a frequent problem. Originally off-street sections used the conventional Dia. 953 variant "trams … Continue reading Should we allow exemptions to No Entry signs? A lesson from Ireland.